Teacher Development

Understanding nature of science is, now, widely perceived to be a vital learning outcome of science education. In this article, we briefly discuss the rationale for introducing ‘nature of science’ in school science curricula, its evolving perspectives, and the approaches we may adopt to enable the learning of this topic...

The teacher has become crucial to strengthening of the educational process and development. There has been ample research to show that the nature, motivation and the capability of the teacher to engage and involve children is critical to learning.

This article explores the role of beauty in science education. The authors use research in science education to highlight the importance of teachers consciously making connections to aesthetic aspects in science. Caring about beauty in science can inspire a sense of wonder and curiosity among students.

When we think about the teacher, images of students, classrooms and schools spring up in the mind. We talk about the number of students the teacher teaches, the furniture and teaching aids in the classroom, the type of school, small or large, and the like. These we understand as the context in which the teacher works, and we are aware that the context influences the manner in which the teacher teaches.

Setting the context

All these years was a struggle to find out if there is a patttern of what goes into making a good school. I want to share here how the process unfolded itself from trying to find out elements or a pattern that make a good school, to understanding that there cannot be a single reason or element that makes a good school to slowly being able to get some, very minimal understanding I should confess, of two elements that emerge from the schools we have been engaged for more than a decade. Not a new thing for the field of education , but for us it has been a hard earned learning.

“Choice of subjects to teach is not entirely involuntary in this school,” joked the veteran Physics teacher. We were discussing the possibility of my moving to High School to teach Physics and Math. Let it be known that I was formally trained to teach junior school and primary school children.
 

"Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience. Our problem is that numbers of people all over the world have obeyed the dictates of the leaders of their government and have gone to war, and millions have been killed because of this obedience. Our problem is that people are obedient all over the world in the face of poverty and starvation and stupidity, and war, and cruelty. Our problem is that people are obedien t while the jails are full of petty thieves, and all the while the grand thieves are running and robbing the country.

I am a math teacher but I have always loved poetry. My interest in these two very different subjects made me wonder if I could bring them together in my classes. I felt that the combination of poetry and math could enthuse even the most reluctant child to learn maths.

maths-and-poetry-2

Rex D' Rozario was not a scientist. Nor was he a science graduate. When it comes to the most influential science journalists, his is a revered name. He was with Kishore Bharati, a Prof Anil Sadagopal's initiative.

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