Classroom Resources

Many scientific concepts can be understood and demonstrated through simple experiments, using locally available low-cost material. This article presents a few simple but exciting experiments that can be used to understand foundational principles in physics.

By cutting the end of a straw you can create a reed instrument that you can actually play a tune on. You can also learn some things about the science of sound and music.

Also look at this video to make a reed based flute only with straws. Looks simple but you need to try this with your students.

Pose these problems to the Senior School students...

Factors and multiples, tables and long division – students who are relieved at mastering these in numbers are confounded when the same topics rear their head in algebra. Here is a nice collection of problems that allow students to play with algebraic expressions and study them through the lens of divisibility.

For the middle school student, the transition from arithmetic to algebra is often quite daunting. In grade VI, the concept of a ‘variable’ is encountered for the first time. This is the stage where either a child embraces the newly introduced ‘Algebra’ or gets overwhelmed with the idea of numbers being replaced by letters of the alphabet. This is also the stage where the students learn to solve equations and find the value(s) of the unknown(s).

Press fit a long plastic pen tube in a bottle lid. Press a hard straw on the rim for blowing. Stretch a torn balloon on the lid to make a taut membrane. Push the pen from below to touch the membrane. Now on blowing through the straw you will hear loud sound. The vibrating membrane will produce the sound.

For pictorial view of the steps to make this toy, click on this link: http://www.arvindguptatoys.com/toys/Loudlid.html

In this article, we focus on investigations with graph paper. Pages 45 & 46 give guidelines for the facilitator, pages 43 & 44 are a worksheet for students. This time we explore quadrilaterals and triangles using lattice points.

In this article, student Satvik Kaushik investigates Armstrong numbers. Mathematical investigation is a powerful way for students to learn more about concepts that interest them. In mathematical investigations, students are expected to pose their own problems after initial exploration of the mathematical situation.

In this short note, we discuss a theorem (arc-centre theorem) which states that an arc can have only one centre of curvature.

This article describes an activity where students created different geometrical shapes using a closed-loop string and developed conceptual understanding by engaging with properties of the shapes. The activity encouraged them to think deeply about the meaning of points, straight lines, edges, faces, and angles of geometrical shapes. Using standard models which are generally available, students only get to view geometrical shapes or build them by following a set of instructions.

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