Classroom Resources

Making a proper parachute toy requires a little bit more efforts in terms of measurement and precision. Using a plastic cover with a paper cup can be a simpler model for smaller kids to enjoy making parachute. Replace the paper cup with a small weight and see what happens.

In the very hearts of galaxies, like our Milky Way, lurk giant black holes that sometimes evolve into monstrous powerhouses of light. How do we know that they exist? How are they born? How do they grow? Are they important in the ‘big picture’?

This frog made with a piece of cardboard, rubber band and cello tape will jump suddenly and amaze the observer. A funny toy to demonstrate elasticity, potential and kinetic energy, acceleration etc. Some art work on the toy will make the toy look more interesting.

Materials needed: Cardboard piece, rubber band, cello tape and scissor 

 

 

What do you do with the old CDs at home, which aren't being used? How about involving your students to make some lovely toys out of it? We have curated some short videos on toys which can be made from old CDs.

CD Hovercraft

Discussion Points: Air Pressure, Newton's third Law

Blow and Float CD

How does one introduce a topic like ratio, which is so widely present in daily life and so intimately connected with human experiences? Our cherished cultural achievements are permeated with it: music is full of ratios, as is art. Our daily existence involves cooking and shopping, and these are filled through and through with the usage of ratio. Shadows, which are present with us all through the day, offer a visual depiction of ratios in action.

Interesting problem on area and triangle.

Some problems for the Senior School.

This is the third in the series of explorations of the properties of addition and multiplication with different number sets. After considering the set of (i) Whole numbers and (ii) Non-negative rational numbers 1 , in this article we will deal with the integers. This is a good time to reflect on the series − its need and aspiration.

In our last Low Floor High Ceiling article, we had looked at Squaring the Dots... a series of questions on counting the dots inside squares of different sizes and orientations drawn on dotted paper with the dots as lattice points. The focus of the activity was to tilt squares and try to find a general formula for the number of dots inside the square of a particular tilt, as the side of the square changed.

I write this to tell myself that it was not a dream...

This year I taught a bunch of fifth standard kids in Sahyadri School KFI (Krishnamurti Foundation India), who, like all others of their age, were high-energy kids; they were willing to explore but found it difficult to sit down in one place. I had a great relationship with them. The air in the classroom was of love, trust and wonder!

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