Classroom Resources

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9... and 0. With just these ten symbols, we can write any rational number imaginable. But why these particular symbols? Why ten of them? And why do we arrange them the way we do? Alessandra King gives a brief history of numerical systems.

Help your learners build on the basics of structural engineering, courtesy Arvind Gupta. You may show Leonardo's Bridge with this activity.

This time in Meena's story, her teacher talks about the need for cleanliness and how it helps them stay away from disease causing worms.

Raju is a city kid who gets most of his fruits out of juice cartons and jam bottles. One day he gets a chance to visit his grandfather's orchard, where all the trees are full of fruit. Join him on his exciting journey of discovery in this book titled 'Ruby Red, Rosy Red'.

The ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter is always the same: 3.14159... and on and on (literally!) forever. This irrational number, pi, has an infinite number of digits, so we'll never figure out its exact value no matter how close we seem to get. Reynaldo Lopes explains pi's vast applications to the study of music, financial models, and even the density of the universe.

Present this crossword on water cycle to assess how much your learners have comprehended the concept.

This activity will help the children identify different vegetables and assess their drawing skills.

How high can you count on your fingers? It seems like a question with an obvious answer. After all, most of us have ten fingers -- or to be more precise, eight fingers and two thumbs. This gives us a total of ten digits on our two hands, which we use to count to ten. But is that really as high as we can go? James Tanton investigates. 

When will you see what phase of moon? Would you be able to see first quarter in the early morning sky? Would you be able to see third crescent in the western sky?

This article explains couple of important properties of triangular numbers, how they can be used in puzzle solving, and how triangular numbers are related to combinations. Concepts are explained in the form of puzzles and graphical illustrations. Triangular numbers are the count of objects that can be arranged in the form of an equilateral triangle. (Just like how square number s are the count of objects that can arranged in the form of a square).

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