Classroom Resources

This TED Ed lesson takes you though the history & science of milk production.

After showing the video, invite your learners to this short quiz.

Additional info for further discussions:

Last July we shared Nature Detectives Bingo game. Here is a modified version specific to the high altitude region of Spiti/Ladakh. You are welcome to customize it further that suits your learners' neighbourhood. This is an outdoor "Bingo" game that can be played in a neighbourhood park, lake or any open area. It is designed to get children outdoors and observing birds and their habitat.

When something is being passed around, children are always anxious to see when their own turn would come. This activity utilizes that excitement.

 

A book talk is a presentation of a book by one student to others in the class. In a period of 45 minutes, two children can talk about a book they have read recently. This activity can be done over one term in the academic year for each class or for selected classes.

Grammar is the collection of rules and conventions that make languages go. This Khan Academy video introduces the nouns.

Check out this practice session on their website.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9... and 0. With just these ten symbols, we can write any rational number imaginable. But why these particular symbols? Why ten of them? And why do we arrange them the way we do? Alessandra King gives a brief history of numerical systems.

Help your learners build on the basics of structural engineering, courtesy Arvind Gupta. You may show Leonardo's Bridge with this activity.

This time in Meena's story, her teacher talks about the need for cleanliness and how it helps them stay away from disease causing worms.

Raju is a city kid who gets most of his fruits out of juice cartons and jam bottles. One day he gets a chance to visit his grandfather's orchard, where all the trees are full of fruit. Join him on his exciting journey of discovery in this book titled 'Ruby Red, Rosy Red'.

The ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter is always the same: 3.14159... and on and on (literally!) forever. This irrational number, pi, has an infinite number of digits, so we'll never figure out its exact value no matter how close we seem to get. Reynaldo Lopes explains pi's vast applications to the study of music, financial models, and even the density of the universe.

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