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Aditya Gupta

A child’s mind is like that of a butterfly in the garden which gets attracted to flowers of different hues and their enchanting fragrance. Children minutely observe happenings and activities in their surroundings and react to the smallest of change. They try to understand an activity or change on the basis of their perception and prior knowledge and develop their ideas. From here, begins the role of a teacher.

Butterflies have always been a source of beauty and wonder. But, what gives these lovely insects their attractive colours? What is the best time to watch them? What do we know about their behaviour? In this article, the author explores the fascinating world of butterflies, sharing some ideas to bring them to life in the science classroom.
 
Did you know that the outdoors, teeming with plants, animals, birds and insects can transform into an immersive and captivating classroom? Nature Calls is a series of nature-based activities designed to encourage students to explore their surroundings, and stimulate their wonder and curiosity about nature.
 

Shreelata Rao Seshadri

Ritika Gupta

“Manveen can paint a room in 3 hours and Allen can paint it in 6 hours. How much time will it take them to paint the room if they work together?”

“Manveen can paint a room in 3 hours and Allen can paint it in 6 hours. How much time will it take them to paint the room if they work together?”

The geometers of ancient Greece invented a peculiar game for themselves, a game called Construction, whose objective is to draw various geometric figures of interest. We are permitted to use just two instruments: an unmarked straightedge (a ‘ruler’), and a compass. Using these, we can draw a straight line through any given pair of points, and we can draw a circle with any given point as centre and passing through any other given point. (Oh yes, we also possess a pencil and an eraser, please do not feel worried about that!)

A curious 11-year old boy walks up to his teacher to ask, “What is a flame? What’s going on in there?” After a brief pause, the teacher replies, “Oxidation”. Factually speaking, the teacher was right on point, but the student felt deflated, wondering if there’s more to explaining the science behind something other than giving it a different name! The kid in this story grew up to be the famed Hollywood actor and director, Alan Alda.
The microscope is the mainstay of cutting edge research in many fields of biology today. When was it invented? What did the initial versions look like? What are some of the latest versions, and what can we use them for? This article provides glimpses into the history of microscopes before recounting some of its more recent and exciting developments.
 

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