Class 11-12

"Green Games' is a selection of Environmental Education games-old and new-which have proved to be effective and popular with both adults and children. Some of the games in this manual have been developed by CEE. Some others are adaptations of popular EE games, modified to suit the Indian context. Most games in the manual need little inputs in terms of materials. They are also flexible enough to be played with larger groups of players, like in a school or a college setting.

Drinking underwater candle is a Fun Science Experiment to observe the change in th

Paper Chromatography is a Cool Chemistry Science Experiment for Kids to do at Home or in School. In this Experiment Kids learn How Vegetables and Fruits Get the Color . Learn about the color mixing . Cool Science Experiment for Kids to do at Home.
Items Required : Fruits, Flowers, Ethanol, Chemistry Labware

For more interesting and cool Science Experiments, you can visit ZLife Youtube Channel

Mittu is smitten by a photograph of what looks like an ‘X’ in his grandpa’s scrapbook. In response to his questions, Grandpa narrates a story — that of the discovery of the ‘molecule of life’. Does Mittu succeed in his quest to understand the mystery of ‘X’? Let’s find out.

Can there be anything common between the change in pitch of the sound of a motor bike as it zips past us and the light emitted by distant stars as they move away from us? Yes! They are subjected to the Doppler effect.

Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are a newly developed class of materials that allow us to store vast amounts of gases at low pressures in small volumes. Why do these materials matter? How do we use them? This article explores advances in our understanding of MOFs.

Pose these problems to the Senior School students...

The Pythagorean equation x^2 + y^2 = z^2 (to be solved over the positive integers N) is a much-studied one; many articles have appeared in this magazine alone, devoted to this equation. A close relative to this is the equation 1/x + 1/y = 1/z (which can be written as x^−1 + y^−1 = z^−1 ; in this form, its similarity to the Pythagorean equation is readily seen), and this too has been studied many times in At Right Angles.

On the Facebook page (AtRiUM: At Right Angles, Us and Math) linked to this magazine, one of our contributors, Arsalan Wares, has been astonishingly prolific in posting problems. A good many of these have had to do with regular hexagons; more specifically, with the areas of polygonal regions drawn within such hexagons. It is both astonishing and pleasing to see such a rich diversity of problems arising from this simple and familiar structure.

In this edition of ‘Adventures’ we study a few miscellaneous problems, mostly from the Pre-Regional Mathematics Olympiad (PRMO; this year’s PRMO was conducted on August 19 in centres all over the country). As usual, we pose the problems first and present solutions later.

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