Social Studies

Imagine a Social Studies class in which the desks have been pushed together to make groups of about 5 students. In each group the students are busy discussing with each other, peering into atlases, searching through an index, and noting down their friends’ opinions.

Have you often found yourself wondering how exactly to make a history lesson interesting and relevant to your students? Suggested in this update is a way to help children comprehend the basics of history by interacting with the elderly and learning through a process of analogy.

Vikas Arora shares this video from localfutures.org. You may use it in your social studies and economics class to trigger a discussion around fund allocation and resource distribution. Ask your learners to express and engage what happens in their family, at the local grocery shop and at a bigger super market. You may introduce them to the trend of 'artificial scarcity' and the price rise. Invite all ideas from them and also ask them to think of possible solutions. They may start with a mini project of budget allocation in their classroom project as a starter.

The assignment that you ask your learners to complete is not same as a practice worksheet.

A good assignment in any subject at any level should take into consideration the following points.

1. An assignment should have a well defined objective.

Geography is one of the oldest disciplines in the world. Rich contributions from Eratosthenes, Ptolemy, Al-Masudi, Al-Biruni, Ibn Battuta, Ibn Khaldun and later by Carl Ritter, Emanuel Kant (yes the philosopher), Vidal la Blache and many more made it a discipline to investigate and unravel the mysteries. The classroom teaching of geography almost always fails to capture that awe of this wonderful subject.

Today is Charlie Chaplin's birthday. He made you smile by being silent through out his illustrious career. But then, in 1940 he made 'The Great Dictator' where he spoke only once. Not a homily. But that which trancends region, religion, language, caste, creed & colour. A voice of conscience which was pained at the happenings of that era. We are including Melody Sheep version of the speech which remixed the images from the contemporary happenings. Relevant as ever.

In schools everywhere, students are deeply affected by current events. Certain policy changes and related commentary can cause children to experience fear, confusion and anxiety. For example, some kids might fear deportation.

Instead of making a statement, Ask a question.

To my mind, there are two compelling reasons for considering the environment in the context of children’s education. The first is that good education helps children construct knowledge and develop understanding through interaction with their immediate environment. The second is that we as a species need an education that will bring about a deeper relatedness to the environment. A relatedness that will prevent us from destroying the very basis of our lives.

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