Science & Technology

There are 7 billion people, more than 100 trillion ants, and more than a billion honey bees in the world. Where did all this diversity come from? How did we evolve - what’s the human story? In this article, the author explores some of the ways in which we’ve tried to answer these questions.
 
This book is particularly a preparation for understanding Science. Science is built from curiosity, experience, analysis and finally the expression of a discovery. The main part of this process is arranging objects, activities and ideas so as to create a new order or pattern. Science is the discovery of new patterns. This book is to help children discover the patterns and arrangements of the world around them by using their hands, senses and minds.
The gut environment is complex, with different amounts and types of micro-organisms along its length. What role do commensal intestinal micro-organisms have on homeostatic mechanisms in health and development of disease? This article explores some of these emerging frontiers in our understanding of gut bacteria.
 
The human brain never stops recording. It stores large amounts of information effortlessly. How does it achieve this? And, why are memories so important? This article provides insights to what encompasses memory and the role memories play in our lives.
 
Oliver Sacks was a neurologist who brought the brain to popular imagination in latter part of the 20th century. In the article, the author presents Sacks’s work on brain phenomena, ranging from hallucinations and colour blindness, against the  backdrop of his life that was as interesting as the brains and people he studied. Also highlighted is Sacks’s remarkable ability to connect with and communicate about his ‘patients’ in a very humane way.
 
Are you looking for a book that offers a fun, new perspective to science? In this review, join a mother and son as they share their experiences of one such book, called The Agenda of the Apprentice Scientist.
 
Butterflies have always been a source of beauty and wonder. But, what gives these lovely insects their attractive colours? What is the best time to watch them? What do we know about their behaviour? In this article, the author explores the fascinating world of butterflies, sharing some ideas to bring them to life in the science classroom.
 
Did you know that the outdoors, teeming with plants, animals, birds and insects can transform into an immersive and captivating classroom? Nature Calls is a series of nature-based activities designed to encourage students to explore their surroundings, and stimulate their wonder and curiosity about nature.
 
A curious 11-year old boy walks up to his teacher to ask, “What is a flame? What’s going on in there?” After a brief pause, the teacher replies, “Oxidation”. Factually speaking, the teacher was right on point, but the student felt deflated, wondering if there’s more to explaining the science behind something other than giving it a different name! The kid in this story grew up to be the famed Hollywood actor and director, Alan Alda.
The microscope is the mainstay of cutting edge research in many fields of biology today. When was it invented? What did the initial versions look like? What are some of the latest versions, and what can we use them for? This article provides glimpses into the history of microscopes before recounting some of its more recent and exciting developments.
 

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