Science & Technology

Emma Bryce explains how the different parts of the digestive system work to transform your food into the nutrients and energy that keep you alive. It is a tale of tracing food’s nine-meter-long, 40-hour journey through the remarkable digestive tract.

Each time you take a step, 200 muscles work in unison to lift your foot, propel it forward, and set it down. It’s just one of the many thousands of tasks performed by the muscular system: this network of over 650 muscles covers the body and is the reason we can blink, smile, run, jump, and stand upright. So how does it work? Emma Bryce takes you into the body to find out.

Try making this scribbling robot (and also explore the amazing Foucault's pendulum)!

Understanding the working of a capacitor is difficult if done only through theories and problem solving. Some real experiments with capacitors can help the student understand its working more easily. If we supplement that with simulation showing what is actually happening like charging/discharging, changing capacitance etc., the learners will be able to grasp the concept more effectively. Even if we lack necessary amenities to do real experiments with capacitors, simulation can help a lot in understanding capacitors in an interactive way.

Chemistry is everywhere – right from the food that students eat to the toys that they play with. If approached the right way, teachers can build on the natural curiosity of children and make chemistry a subject that they will enjoy learning.

Chemistry is everywhere – right from the food that students eat to the toys that they play with. If approached the right way, teachers can build on the natural curiosity of children and make chemistry a subject that they will enjoy learning.

The deeper you dig, the hotter it gets. Why so? This 2 minute animated story from Minute Earth tells you that.

Dear Teacher,

Khan Academy has launched a Talent Search for amazing explainers to help build the world’s most comprehensive, engaging library of videos.

To understand this, we will have to first know why astronauts/cosmonauts wear space suits. It is obvious that special space suits have been created because living in space is different than living on earth, or even flying in a aeroplane.

One tends to restrict teaching electromagnetic radiation only at a tabularly boring and a dour factual way. But, who says that facts can't be presented in an interesting way! Here's a poster from ICTS that talks about neutron stars and gamma rays that also briefly touches upon this year's Nobel Prize Physics winning idea that your senior school students would be keen more to know about.

Click on the image to view it properly...

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