Mathematics

I am a math teacher but I have always loved poetry. My interest in these two very different subjects made me wonder if I could bring them together in my classes. I felt that the combination of poetry and math could enthuse even the most reluctant child to learn maths.

maths-and-poetry-2

When something is being passed around, children are always anxious to see when their own turn would come. This activity utilizes that excitement.

 

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9... and 0. With just these ten symbols, we can write any rational number imaginable. But why these particular symbols? Why ten of them? And why do we arrange them the way we do? Alessandra King gives a brief history of numerical systems.

Let us dream about the school first!
Let us first imagine the school as a space for children. Imagine yourself to be a child once again.

The ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter is always the same: 3.14159... and on and on (literally!) forever. This irrational number, pi, has an infinite number of digits, so we'll never figure out its exact value no matter how close we seem to get. Reynaldo Lopes explains pi's vast applications to the study of music, financial models, and even the density of the universe.

How high can you count on your fingers? It seems like a question with an obvious answer. After all, most of us have ten fingers -- or to be more precise, eight fingers and two thumbs. This gives us a total of ten digits on our two hands, which we use to count to ten. But is that really as high as we can go? James Tanton investigates. 

When will you see what phase of moon? Would you be able to see first quarter in the early morning sky? Would you be able to see third crescent in the western sky?

This article explains couple of important properties of triangular numbers, how they can be used in puzzle solving, and how triangular numbers are related to combinations. Concepts are explained in the form of puzzles and graphical illustrations. Triangular numbers are the count of objects that can be arranged in the form of an equilateral triangle. (Just like how square number s are the count of objects that can arranged in the form of a square).

Here is a sequel to the Introduction of points and lines (straight and curved) and some inter-linkages as well as lines, rays and line segments.

Introducing points and lines (straight and curved) and some inter-linkages as well as lines, rays and line segments - from Shikshamitra.

Pages

12416 registered users
5338 resources