symmetry

The article talks about a simple activity which can be performed with students of primary, middle and high school. The shape that is used to discuss here is a square and hence it is expected that students know the basic properties of a square. The article also talks about using lines. Even if students don't have a Euclidean notion of definition of a line, that idea can be instilled as the teacher executes this activity.

Each of these faces are made from two copies of the same design. The repeated design is either resized, rotated, or shifted to make the face. Try creating your own symmetrical funny faces.

Republished from: http://thinkzone.wlonk.com/Symmetry/SymmetryFun.htm

David Horsburgh, the foremost practioner of Activity Based Learning in India, in his book Thinking & Doing illustrates how it is possible to shift the agency into the hands of the learners, teacher becoming almost a redundant facilitator in the background.

Here is an annotated excerpt of 10 pages from that celebrated book.

What can a humble matchbox do, one may ask. Check these tried and tested puzzles to enthuse your learners towards patterns, symmetry and a bit of imaginative problem solving, courtesy Arvind Gupta.

For more on match stick TLMs check the attachment below.

In this part we will concentrate on another infinite two-dimensional pattern called the wallpaper pattern and also explore aspects of symmetry in the everyday objects around us. For ease, we reiterate the ‘working definition’ of symmetry here. (the 1st part)

Symmetry seems to be very much a part of our genetic make-up. Even a young child, unschooled in matters, is able to differentiate between symmetrical or regular objects as compared with those that are irregular. Our hearing is tuned to recognise symmetry in rhythm, music and beats. We see beauty in symmetry of monuments, designs, decorations and art. The aim of this article is two-fold. The first is to introduce the reader to the intuitive as well as the mathematical concept of symmetry.

Magic squares have been a source of recreation and leisure from ancient times. There is something about the symmetry and patterns contained in such squares that carry great appeal. In this piece, we shall prove two simple results about 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 magic squares.
 
And also,

 A projector made from trash can be used to demonstrate holographic illusion and to explore symmetry, illusion & reflection.

Eyeglasses can come handy to explore interconnected concepts inside the classroom.

What can cloth clip do in a classroom? Imagine what not!

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