stories

Understanding and visualizing what you read can go a long way in making reading fun and then reading becomes learning. Purinjudha? is a free android app (no ads) that helps you do just that and enjoy reading.

You can use the app to do the following:

School Transformation is a long journey. It is not a two year sprint, but a marathon worth attempting. You need a hero to lead the efforts and we were lucky to find one in Zakaullah sir at Florida English School.

English

Here is a presentation on creating opportunities for children to express themselves.

Here is a silent video on creating opportunities for children to express themselves.

To download the presentation (.ppt) please click here.

Going to school is fun. 

This story about a little girl's experience in school was originally written in Hindi 'Hamaari Balwadi' by Rukmini Banerji and illustrated by Sheetal Thapa and has been translated into English by Madhav Chavan.

Children always enjoy the experience of buying books. This story is by Rukmini Banerji and is illustrated by Santosh Pujari.

This activity is intended for students in pre and primary school. The aim is to encourage children to learn and have fun with language. These can be built on to encourage idea generation for story construction and creative writing.

Children have the power to change their communities, or as the founder of Design For Change terms it - the spirit of 'I CAN'. Read more about this in the article by Gauri Mirashi and Parul Patel...

In October 2009, eight 10 year-old children from a small village named Lordi Dejgara near Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India, stopped sixteen child marriages. 

In 2010, a few 11 year-old students from Lancester, Pennsylvania, U.S.A partnered with the local government to design bicycling paths in their city to tackle obesity. 

This collection is edited by Radhika Menon and Sandhya Rao and illustrated by Nirupama Sekhar. It retells stories from mythology and folklore to focus on the need to protect, conserve and value water. Well-known writers draw upon the oral traditions of Ivory Coast, China, India, Greece, Australia, North America, Spain, Nigeria, Botswana and places beyond names to reflect upon an intrinsic connection, while the pictures are inspired by the rich, visual representations of water across cultures.

Stories and role-playing give students the opportunity to unlock their imagination, and develop verbal intelligence and understand multiple points of view. What better way to learn history than this?

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