rotation

I must confess that it was the top layer that attracted me to quilting. This was clearly a case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts- I was wonderstruck at how scraps of material could be pieced together to make beautiful patterns that were all at once eye-catching and pleasing.

In an earlier issue of At Right Angles, we had studied a gem of Euclidean geometry called Napoleon's Theorem, a result discovered in post-revolution France. We had offered proofs of the theorem that were computational in nature, based on trigonometry and complex numbers. We continue our study of the theorem in this article, and offer proofs that are more geometric in nature; they make extremely effective use of the geometry of rotations

Savour this simple proof for the gem of an Euclidean geometry.

Here is a propelling need to make and play with this toy.

In this part we will concentrate on another infinite two-dimensional pattern called the wallpaper pattern and also explore aspects of symmetry in the everyday objects around us. For ease, we reiterate the ‘working definition’ of symmetry here. (the 1st part)

Arvind Gupta invites you to test Newton's 3rd law of Motion one more time in one more different way and also helps you reuse plastic bottle.

Many of the inanimate objects around you probably seem perfectly still. But look deep into the atomic structure of any of them, and you’ll see a world in constant flux — with stretching, contracting, springing, jittering, drifting atoms everywhere. Ran Tivony describes how and why molecular movement occurs and investigates if it might ever stop.

Symmetry seems to be very much a part of our genetic make-up. Even a young child, unschooled in matters, is able to differentiate between symmetrical or regular objects as compared with those that are irregular. Our hearing is tuned to recognise symmetry in rhythm, music and beats. We see beauty in symmetry of monuments, designs, decorations and art. The aim of this article is two-fold. The first is to introduce the reader to the intuitive as well as the mathematical concept of symmetry.

Explore the concepts of rotation, reflection through a discarded CD & a bottle.

As you blow on the fan it spins and lifts a card below. Why does the card lift? The spinning fan creates a low-pressure zone below it and that lifts-up the card. This work was supported by IUCAA and Tata Trust. This film was made by Ashok Rupner

Pages

17050 registered users
6647 resources