origamics

In this note, we offer an explanation to the observations made in the ‘Origamics’ article (November 2013 issue of At Right
Angles).

Haga’s Origamic activities require students to explore simple, geometric properties found when we fold paper in prescribed ways. The aim of these activities is to give students easy-to-explore paperfolding puzzles so that they can experience a micro-version of the three stages of mathematical research: exploration, conjecture and proof. In this article, we take up another ‘origamics’ exploration by Dr. Kazuo Haga from the chapter 'Intrasquares and Extrasquares' of his book.

Readers were asked to prove the observation made in the Nov 2013 issue of AtRiA. Here is a proof contributed by Swati Sircar.

Haga’s Origamic activities require students to explore simple, geometric properties found when we fold paper in prescribed ways. The aim of these activities is to give students easy-to-explore paperfolding puzzles so that they can experience a micro-version of the three stages of mathematical research: exploration, conjecture and proof.
Here we look at one such activity from the chapter “X-Lines with lots of Surprises”.
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