number system

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9... and 0. With just these ten symbols, we can write any rational number imaginable. But why these particular symbols? Why ten of them? And why do we arrange them the way we do? Alessandra King gives a brief history of numerical systems.

The ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter is always the same: 3.14159... and on and on (literally!) forever. This irrational number, pi, has an infinite number of digits, so we'll never figure out its exact value no matter how close we seem to get. Reynaldo Lopes explains pi's vast applications to the study of music, financial models, and even the density of the universe.

The idea behind the article is to explain how simple math concepts form the basis behind puzzles, and how they could be understood and taught in a fun way. So we can teach number system like binary or ternary system in the form of fun puzzles which are more easily grasped by the students.

This worksheet is designed to help students get an insight into the definition of concepts related to the number system and also to help them understand how numbers are linked to other subjects as well.

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