negative numbers

The understanding of integers and negative numbers in particular poses certain challenges for many people. One difficulty lies with the fact that the negative sign appears along with a number to indicate an object, a number, but the same negative sign is also used for the operation of subtraction.I have shared here an approach which I have learnt from Shri P. K. Srinivasan. I have used it for many years successfully with many batches of students and shared it with many teachers in workshop settings.

They say the pen is mightier than the sword, and authorities have often agreed. From outlawed religious tracts and revolutionary manifestos to censored and burned books, we know the potential power of words to overturn the social order. But as strange as it may seem, some numbers have also been considered dangerous enough to ban. Alessandra King details the history behind illegal numbers.

Here is a quick rewind of some interesting ideas that got featured on the Teachers of India website. We know it is not final. We know there are very many resources you found it useful that we couldn't feature in this particular list. How about you making your own list and sending it to us. We also invite you to remix ideas from your own experience and share it with larger teacher community. That would be a great bang to start the year!

You can also solve more complicated equations on a double ganit mala and open number line. This demo includes equations with multiple operations but with "x" appearing only once.

You can not only learn about basic math operations involving whole numbers and integers, but can also solve equations on a double ganit mala and open number line. This presentation demonstrates the concept of solving simple equations i.e. equations involving only one operation.

Here is a short demo on "x" and its neighbourhood on the double ganit mala and open number line.

How about using a colourful double ganit mala to help your students understand integers better? And an open number line that can be easily drawn? Visualizations can help students with comparing numbers and understanding why one number is less than or greater than another.

A double ganit mala and an open number line can be used to explain the concept of subtraction of integers to students. Swati shows you how. 

Swati shows you how a double ganit mala and an open number line can be used to explain the addition of integers to students. A 'double Ganit mala' is a string with sets of 4 different coloured beads that is used to model the number line.

A 'double Ganit mala' is a string with sets of 4 different coloured beads that is used to model the number line. 2 colours are used for the positive part while the remaining 2 colours are used for the negative part. Swati shows you how to use a double ganit mala to introduce your students to the topic of integers.

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