Multiplication

Paper folding techniques have been successfully used to demonstrate multiplication of proper fractions in the classroom. This article may be used to make sense of the same techniques when applied to improper fractions. The problem at hand is to investigate how a product such as 3/2 x 4/3 may be demonstrated by paper folding.

Deciphering stick-multiplication (popularly known as Chinese, Japanese or Korean method in the internet) with big and small lattice and color-coded arrow cards.

Demonstrating multiplication with base10 blocks (hundreds, tens, units - sometimes known as flats-longs-units) - introductions, properties of multiplication and then the lattice for multi-digit numbers with the help of color-coded arrow cards.

Demonstrating multiplication with base10 blocks (hundreds, tens, units - sometimes known as flats-longs-units) - introductions, properties of multiplication and then the lattice for multi-digit numbers with the help of color-coded arrow cards.

This page provides printable multiplication charts in a variety of high resolution formats. Each version of the chart includes variants with products from 1-81, 1-100, 1-144 and 1-225. There are several different color multiplication charts, including a multi-color rainbow version, and there is a proportioned multiplication chart with cells sized relative to the product for each multiplication fact in the table. There is also a multiplication chart with each cell divided into a grid reflecting the product. All of these charts are powerful ways to memorize the multiplication table!

Swati shares a game from Swanirvar/Shikshamitra that assesses number operations and demands higher order thinking skills. Did we tell you that it is a cheating proof game!?

Here is a quick rewind of some interesting ideas that got featured on the Teachers of India website. We know it is not final. We know there are very many resources you found it useful that we couldn't feature in this particular list. How about you making your own list and sending it to us. We also invite you to remix ideas from your own experience and share it with larger teacher community. That would be a great bang to start the year!

This article is a sequel to an article which appeared in the November 2014 issue of At Right Angles in which we had
described an interesting cryptography method known as the Hill Cipher. The Hill Cipher method is based on matrices and
modular arithmetic. As in the previous article, we will explore the method using the spreadsheet MS Excel in which we will
perform operations on matrices.

A visual manual on how to use a ganitmala to show whole numbers, add, subtract, multiply and divide them. Also includes how to show the division algorithm for HCF.

Multiplication is more than just repeated addition. The writer shares his thoughts on how the concept of basic mathematical operation need to be introduced to students.
 
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