generalisation

The article talks about a simple activity which can be performed with students of primary, middle and high school. The shape that is used to discuss here is a square and hence it is expected that students know the basic properties of a square. The article also talks about using lines. Even if students don't have a Euclidean notion of definition of a line, that idea can be instilled as the teacher executes this activity.

This article is the first in a series dealing with inequalities. We shall show that in the world of algebra as well as the worlds of geometry and trigonometry, there are numerous inequalities of interest which can be proved in ways that are easy as well as instructive.

In an article written in the February 1999 issue of the American Mathematical Monthly, titled appropriately “Magic Squares Indeed!”, the authors point out a truly remarkable property of this magic square; namely:
8162 + 3572 + 4922 = 6182 + 7532 + 2942,
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