CCE

In August 2009, the Indian parliament enacted the Right to Education (RTE) Act which enshrined education from 6 to 14 years as a ‘right’. The Act additionally mandated a variety of ‘requirements’ relating to infrastructure, Pupil Teacher Ratio (PTR), curriculum, teacher training, inclusionary education, and the focus of this article – a continuous and comprehensive student evaluation system (CCE). The objective of these mandates was ensuring a ‘quality’ education for children.

Reforms in assessments have been extensively deliberated in India. National policies and commissions before Independence, such as the Hartog Committee (1929) and Sargent Plan (1944) as well as those post-independence such as the Mudaliar Commission (1953), Kothari Commission (1964), National Policy on Education (NPE) 1968 and ‘86, Learning Without Burden (1993) and National Curriculum Framework (NCF) 2000 and 2005 have recommended changes in the examination system.

Six to ten years of age is appropriate, suitable and wonderful for natural learning. What one learns at this age proves decisive for future plans and laying the quality foundations of a subject. A child of this age coming to school is most ready for learning. It is based on this that many of the recommendations for the implementation of educational schemes, including CCE, are made. These schemes are still on their way, dreaming of reaching their destination.

Professor Krishna Kumar has written a very thought provoking article on the CBSE’s decision to make class X board examination compulsory again. He rightly argues that compulsory class X exam will serve no useful purpose and will increase stress in children.

When we talk to a teacher about Continuous Comprehensive Assessment (CCA) and ask them how they are doing it in their school then they almost always equate assessment with periodic examinations. The very word 'assessment' needs a careful handling of it, particularly the purpose of doing it. The important aspect being who is doing it and what is the intended outcome of such assessment. Assessment can mean how better a child learns (sharing the child's learning with her parents is the intended outcome).

In the previous article we showed the graphing power of Desmos and had described how Desmos helped to bring out the creativity of my students as they explored the concept of ‘Domain and Range of a Function’.

Preparing mark lists for hundreds of students and then taking a print out is a boring and painful chore. Is there a way out to do it fast, so that teachers can address more important issues, namely the art and craft of teaching? Well, you prayers are answered!

In my search for suitable projects which encompassed a wide spectrum of arithmetic, geometric and algebraic components with a focus on mensuration, I naturally turned to tangrams. This topic is a favourite for both teachers and project designers...writes Sneha Titus.

"Assessment needs to provide answers for two questions:ƒ How is the student evolving as a learner? ƒ What can I do to facilitate that learning? With the encouragement of a supportive principal, I re-worked the model for formative assessment..."

For part 1 of the article, click here.

Pages

16771 registered users
6597 resources