Class 1-2

When we think about the teacher, images of students, classrooms and schools spring up in the mind. We talk about the number of students the teacher teaches, the furniture and teaching aids in the classroom, the type of school, small or large, and the like. These we understand as the context in which the teacher works, and we are aware that the context influences the manner in which the teacher teaches.

Setting the context

All these years was a struggle to find out if there is a patttern of what goes into making a good school. I want to share here how the process unfolded itself from trying to find out elements or a pattern that make a good school, to understanding that there cannot be a single reason or element that makes a good school to slowly being able to get some, very minimal understanding I should confess, of two elements that emerge from the schools we have been engaged for more than a decade. Not a new thing for the field of education , but for us it has been a hard earned learning.

Last July we shared Nature Detectives Bingo game. Here is a modified version specific to the high altitude region of Spiti/Ladakh. You are welcome to customize it further that suits your learners' neighbourhood. This is an outdoor "Bingo" game that can be played in a neighbourhood park, lake or any open area. It is designed to get children outdoors and observing birds and their habitat.

This time in Meena's story, her teacher talks about the need for cleanliness and how it helps them stay away from disease causing worms.

Let us dream about the school first!
Let us first imagine the school as a space for children. Imagine yourself to be a child once again.

Do you remember being taught you should never start your sentences with “And” or “But”?

What if I told you that your teachers were wrong and there are lots of other so-called grammar rules that we’ve probably been getting wrong in our English classrooms for years?

How high can you count on your fingers? It seems like a question with an obvious answer. After all, most of us have ten fingers -- or to be more precise, eight fingers and two thumbs. This gives us a total of ten digits on our two hands, which we use to count to ten. But is that really as high as we can go? James Tanton investigates. 

event1

Pooja Keshavan Singh looks at the little known learning disability, dyscalculia.

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