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This electric motor boat is easy to make and can be seen sailing in a bath tub or a small pond.

Materials Required:

two plastic bottle, two pencils (find used pen instead or bamboo stick of same size), hard cardboard (instead of popsicles), a small dc motor, propellor (you can make yourself with a plastic bottle), cello tape, soldering iron, glue (fevibond will work)

Drinking underwater candle is a Fun Science Experiment to observe the change in th

Emma Bryce explains how the different parts of the digestive system work to transform your food into the nutrients and energy that keep you alive. It is a tale of tracing food’s nine-meter-long, 40-hour journey through the remarkable digestive tract.

Each time you take a step, 200 muscles work in unison to lift your foot, propel it forward, and set it down. It’s just one of the many thousands of tasks performed by the muscular system: this network of over 650 muscles covers the body and is the reason we can blink, smile, run, jump, and stand upright. So how does it work? Emma Bryce takes you into the body to find out.

2,500 years ago, the writing of history as we know it didn’t exist. The past was recorded as a list of events, with little explanation for their causes beyond accepting things as the will of the gods. Herodotus wanted a deeper understanding, so he took a new approach: looking at events from both sides to understand the reasons for them. Mark Robinson explains how “history” came into being.

The deeper you dig, the hotter it gets. Why so? This 2 minute animated story from Minute Earth tells you that.

Math is full of symbols: lines, dots, arrows, English letters, Greek letters, superscripts, subscripts ... it can look like an illegible jumble. Where did all of these symbols come from? John David Walters shares the origins of mathematical symbols, and illuminates why they’re still so important in the field today.

What exactly makes a poem … a poem? Poets themselves have struggled with this question, often using metaphors to approximate a definition. Is a poem a little machine? A firework? An echo? A dream? Melissa Kovacs shares three recognizable characteristics of most poetry.

Next, take them through a short quiz here.

Senior graders may take the follwing discussion further.

They say the pen is mightier than the sword, and authorities have often agreed. From outlawed religious tracts and revolutionary manifestos to censored and burned books, we know the potential power of words to overturn the social order. But as strange as it may seem, some numbers have also been considered dangerous enough to ban. Alessandra King details the history behind illegal numbers.

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Einstein, and American President James Garfield have in common? They all came up with elegant proofs for the famous Pythagorean theorem, one of the most fundamental rules of geometry and the basis for practical applications like constructing stable buildings and triangulating GPS coordinates. Betty Fei details these three famous proofs.

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