CC BY-NC-SA

What if teachers were to provide interesting but also confusing contexts to students? Would it encourage students to ask questions, and do their own investigations? In this article, the authors present an example of how a plant with variegated leaves provoked students to conduct a series of investigations to satisfy their own curiousity about the natural world.
 
This article presents the journey of a group of science teachers in exploring Archimedes principle, and related concepts, through well-loved fables like that of the Thirsty Crow, as well as a series of simple, open-ended experiments with readily available material.
 
Lolitika Mandal is an Assistant Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Mohali. Her research has contributed to a global understanding of how blood cells develop. In this interview, she shares her experiences and insights on the life of a scientist.
 
Tell us something about your current work.

Prema Raghunath

This book outlines the education policy that the Delhi Government has espoused under the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) during its first tenure.

Indira Vijayasimha

Student errors are often a source of irritation, frustration and even anger to teachers. Many of us have memories of our schoolwork heavily marked with red ink highlighting our mistakes and making us feel fearful, ashamed and stupid. However, errors need to be seen as part of the learning process. They can provide many insights to both the teacher and the taught.

How did we discover the existence of Pluto? Why have we reclassified Pluto as a dwarf planet? What do we know of other dwarf planets? How do we decide if a celestial body is to be classified as a planet or not? Read on for a first-hand account by Pluto.
 

Vinatha Viswanathan and Ruchi Shevade

A brief history of children’s magazines

Join the author in an exciting narrative about the Gut, a small but amazing organ that does so many things that it is called the second brain. From digesting anything that is put in it to controlling feelings and emotions, the Gut is a Jack of all trades, and a master in every one of them.
 

Vidhya Das

Swati Sircar

Basic numerical skills are a must-have in today’s world. No matter what one does, the ability to add, subtract, multiply and divide is crucial and needed for everyday matters. Naturally, these take up a large portion of the math syllabi at the primary level. However, many reports including the Annual Status of Education Reports (ASER) indicate that our children are not picking up these skills adequately. What can be the reasons?

Pages

18809 registered users
7333 resources