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The Gaddankeri Higher Primary School (HPS) is situated in the city area of Gaddankeri. Around Gaddankeri, there were a number of brick kilns. According to sources, between 2008 to 2014, when there were fewer brick kilns (bhattis, in local language), some children used to work in these. It was at that time that Sukanya Gangal started meeting the kiln owners and parents of the children working there to motivate them to send the children to school. This had its impact and children began to attend school from November to February, every year.

English
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